In prehistoric days, life was definitely easier in some ways.  I mean, they did not have to worry about commuter traffic, what to bring for a Christmas party and how frustrating it is when places don't provide free WiFi.  All they had to worry about was not starving to death, disease from food and being eaten by large animals.  Yes, life was must simpler. 

Thanks to our friends in the world of IoT, we are going to take one of the worries out of life....falling asleep and missing part of your program on Netflix. 

As athletic as I try to be, even I get so into a show that I end up "binge-watching", and Netflix is often on when this happens.  Ranging from "House of Cards" to "Narcos", they have some of the most addictive shows available anywhere.  It makes sense that you don't want to miss any of it, and now thanks to your socks, you won't. 

Wait, did you just say SOCKS?  I really wish that I was making this up, actually....

netflix socks


A Do-it-yourself product is available through Netflix (click here if you think I am kidding
).  It allows you to build a pair of socks that will detect when you are asleep, as opposed to just lying there motionless while Daredevil fights Wilson Fisk.  If it detects that you are actually counting sheep, a signal is sent to tell your Netflix to pause.  In the event that it thinks you are asleep (but you are not actually snoring), it will warn you first.  All you have to do is move slightly and it will continue on... 

So many questions come up... 

1. What a useless piece of crap this is, why bother?  I guess to some people, this is actually a problem that needed to be solved...

2. If what you are watching is so riveting that you can't bare to miss a second of it, why are you falling asleep anyways?

3. If you have enough skill to do something like this, might you want to put your skills to something more useful....like a system that automatically notices when your cat is doing something cute, films it and posts it on YouTube? 

Bottom Line

While I always like when an IoT-related gadget gets news attention, this one makes me shiver.  I am almost not sure if it is real, as I am hoping this is just a really weird and early April Fools joke from our friends at Netflix.  It also is a great example of a "First World problem", in the same manner that most people know the "Hot Coffee at McDonald's" as a quick example of a frivolous law suit.  However, if it helps to bring joy to people's life, I guess it is harmless.